Tuesday, May 23, 2006

Essay on Racism

I often agree with Wendy McElroy. Here's a recent essay of hers in which she asks if racism in America is worse today than in, say, the 1980s.

Before you write Wendy off because this essay is on the FoxNews web site, let's read a little about her:

Wendy McElroy is the editor of ifeminists.com and a research fellow for The Independent Institute in Oakland, Calif. She is the author and editor of many books and articles, including the new book, "Liberty for Women: Freedom and Feminism in the 21st Century" (Ivan R. Dee/Independent Institute, 2002). She lives with her husband in Canada.

Now, her essay.

I believe it is worse and that the measures intended to remedy racism are a major cause of the deterioration. Decades ago, the issue of race needed shaking to its root. On a cultural level, any honest re-examination would have resulted in improvement. On a legal level, removing Jim Crow laws and all other references to race within the legal system was necessary.

But instead of removing references to race, many laws and policies used race as a filter to define the treatment an individual would receive not only by government but also in non-governmental arenas, such as employment.

The institutionalization of racial bias occurred on both a federal and local level. (emphasis mine--Darren)

I think she's onto something here.


Lillian said...

I have been categorized as colored (birth), negro, black, afro-American, African-American, other, quadroon, octaroon, melungeon, and nigger.

Of all of these 'race' labels I prefer colored the best, but only if "multi-" is added to it.

In the event that the category of 'multi-colored' is not available, I just insert 'human' for race.

My favorite label, though, is AMERICAN.

Having personally lived through 'Jim Crow' segregation, marched with Dr. King, and witnessed America 'self correct', I feel I have a right to graduate to this 'new' category.

At last. :-)

Darren said...

On the TV series Star Trek: Enterprise, which takes place about a 100 years before Kirk's series, an Andorian captain refers to Captain Archer as "pinkskin". No reference was made to Ensign Mayweather, who was, shall we say, somewhat darker.

Oh Lillian, I can tell how unpopular you must be with others who are non-pinkskins.