Saturday, January 31, 2009

Rain Forests Increasing In Latin America?

According to this post, which links to a New York Times story, the answer is yes.

7 comments:

M.A. said...

This must be bad for the planet since an increase in rain forests would also mean more plants...which produce CO2.

Maybe these countries where rain forests are increasing should have to pay for the extra carbon credits.

Sorry, I couldn't resist.

allen (in Michigan) said...

This just follows the example set by the U.S.

As agriculture got increasingly efficient farmers went bankrupt and the marginal farms were simply abandoned. Michigan is strewn with abandoned farms and some of the best deer hunting occurs in abandoned orchards.

This has occurred all over the country. So much so that the amount of acreage covered by forest stopped diminishing some decades ago and has recovered quite a bit.

Anonymous said...

Just so you know, plants don't produce C02.

MikeAT said...

Your right Anon....they remove the C and just leave the O2 for mammals like us!

socalmike said...

It seems to me like the Latin American countries like the taste of "ecotourism". Costa Rica learned that many years ago, and it saved their country. Good for those countries that are saving the rain forests.

M.A. said...

Oops, you're right. I don't know what's wrong with me. Thought I had a zinger there...but, I need to stop commenting when I'm so exhausted.

My apologies.

Ellen K said...

What plants do increase is humidity. And increased humidity creates atmospheric instability which creates more rain, more storms, and dare I say it, more hurricanes. So maybe they should have to pay for the next one that rolls through the Gulf Coast.