Monday, March 16, 2009

Rough Job Market For Graduating Seniors

Two things I can say about West Point: no student loans, and we had guaranteed jobs upon graduation! This year's class of college and university graduates is going to have a rougher go than usual in the job market:

Suzanne Block isn't basking in the insulating embrace of college as she waits the eight weeks until her May 9 graduation from Lake Forest College.

When she's not in class or studying, she's scanning online job sites, sending out résumés and cold-calling potential employers, anything that might get the frustrated 21-year-old a job.

"Damn me for being born in '87," said the English and communications major. "This is just a nightmare. There could not be a worse time to be looking for a job."

Update, 3/17/09: When the state is billions of dollars in the red, how can we not consider increasing tuition at our colleges and universities? These students seem to think they're owed an inexpensive education. I agree with the brilliant commenter on that article who said:

When government funds your education, the funding gets cut when the treasury dries up--like now, in not-so-good economic times. Think about that when you want the government to run your /health care/.

6 comments:

Marianne said...

I believe the current data suggests it's still better than the job market was for 1982 graduates. Some of us have been here before...

Erica said...

And she didn't get a competitive degree such as mathematics or engineering because...?

Ellen K said...

Here's the deal. There are jobs out there if you are willing to move, to accept something less than middle management or if you can take your pride down a notch. I have a kid who graduated last year. She's working at a growing facility, using her degree and with the growth they are experiencing, she may end up a facility manager by the end of next year. In her previous job, before graduation, she was one of the top line salespersons in the nation. I think having a job in college makes you a better hire after graduation. My son has worked two jobs in a management capacity. Granted, it's mid level restaurant management, but he still had to deal with customers, personnel, scheduling, catering and such. He has learned how to work. His degree is in history and he doesn't want to teach or write. But he will get a job. Part of the problem is that many kids entered into majors with dollar signs in their eyes. They thought there was some sort of guarantee that when they graduated with a degree in computer science or engineering that the employers would offer them the moon. That only happens to the best of the best. I know guys who have twenty years experience in aerospace and grad degrees who are out of work. But my husband, who doesn't have a degree, but has contacts from thirty years in sales, was only out of work two months. It's not easy and you have to make sacrifices, which may mean taking interim jobs while you are looking, but the jobs are out there if you are willing to meet employers half way.

PeggyU said...

Heh, Marianne. That's exactly what I was thinking. I recall pounding the pavement in '82 and being happy to at least have a job at Pizza Hut.

Ellen K said...

It's funny, but the majority of my kids friends are engineering majors. While I would agree that there is a need for engineers, I see it being just like a BBA was in the 80's. Everyone wanted to get rich, so they majored in business. Then in the 90's everyone who wanted to get rich was a computer science major. Now all the kids who want to get rich are engineers. While it may work for some, engineering isn't for those who don't like to get their hands dirty. And many of these kids have never worked doing anything more strenuous than taking orders for fastfood.

Chanman said...

Born in 1987 and she is graduating from college? Good Lord, I feel old!