Sunday, November 26, 2006

Queer Studies, Women's Studies...

...Fat Studies.

1 comment:

John S. said...

Honestly, why not fat studies? When do we draw the line? No doubt, the increased fragmenting and specialization of the social sciences has been the result of the democratization of the fields and that the driving force is often marginalized groups who feel victimized. While fat people want attention in the classroom, so do creationists, feminists, Muslims, homosexuals, Catholics, Native Americans, and on and on. Certainly, this leads to increased specialization into seemingly trivial fields of study (like fat people studies). Honestly, I have no idea where to draw the line. On the surface fat studies seems ridiculous. Nevertheless, so did African-American studies, women studies, etc when they were first introduced. None of us would doubt their value today. Right? Yet, I am not na├»ve enough to not recognize this idea of fat studies is bizarre. Still, where is the line drawn? Is not the nature of social sciences to specialize and fragment further and further—an increased division of labor? Likewise, does not the further fragmenting and specialization help to endorse a more sound grand narrative when the parts are understood to contribute to the whole. Again, I agree fat studies seems outlandish, however, I could rationalize it as a sub-discipline in psychology, sociology, anthropology, and history. Cannot wait for that first great dissertation, “How Overeating Could Have Thwarted 9/11.”