Sunday, March 06, 2011

How Long Does It Take To Fire A Teacher?

Click here to see the chart showing the process.
TWO YEARS to get rid of a teacher? Insanity. Me? I can be canned today. This minute and I gotta find another job. Sanity is somewhere in the middle of those two.

6 comments:

Ellen K said...

Layoffs are coming. Like it or not, those union teachers in Wisconsin and Ohio will be faced with either lower pay or fewer jobs. And union leaders can scream all they want, but there's only so much money in the piggy bank. Hey when even places like Dallas are discussing layoffs of up to 45% of teachers in some schools, times are bad.

mazenko said...

Ellen,

Saying "even Dallas" implies it's surprising or unrealistic that cities in Texas, and the state of Texas, would have budget problems. It's not surprising to people who know Texans have been cutting revenue beyond reasonable levels for years, even decades. It was only recently that conservatives were lauding the supply-side, business focused brilliance of Texas. Now, they're facing a coming budget crisis to rival Illinois and California. That's because their economic theories are weak, and they have ideologically weakened revenue stream below the basic needs and desires of the population. California has made the same mistake countless times by limiting the ability to raise revenue, even as people want and vote for increased spending. When citizens, especially conservatives, take a realistic look at revenue and spending and adequately fund their government - while rooting out wasteful spending - the whole country will be better off.

Anonymous said...

When citizens, especially conservatives, take a realistic look at revenue and spending and adequately fund their government - while rooting out wasteful spending - the whole country will be better off.

Isn't that the concept behind the Tea Party? I know it is very libertarian. Cut spending to match income? Balanced budgets? What a novel concept.

mazenko said...

That's one sided, Anon, and continues to miss the point. Why is it only "cut spending" to match income. Much of the problem comes from "cutting revenue" while ignoring and increasing spending.

Anonymous said...

Almost 20 years ago, I remember reading that it cost Montgomery County, MD (suburban DC) $600k to fire a teacher. I understand that the process was - and undoubtedly still is - similar to the one posted here. Naturally, firing was avoided; the "dance of the lemons" ensured that the problems kept moving. It also explains why one of my kids had a senile teacher; she was only a few years short of her max retirement. The fact that at least five 4th-grade classes spent most of their time helping her find her glasses was irrelevant.

mazenko said...

Wow, what an incredibly poorly administrated district. The principal, evaluators, superintendent, and school board should have been held accountable for their incompetent management. What a shame.